Thursday, 13 January 2011

Fantasia Mosaic (V)



Hey folks - I'm off school today and I won't be back until Monday. Since I can post this mosaic on time, and that my sadness and disappointment from yesterday is recovering. Perhaps, my postings here will make me feel better - and to hear feedback from others. Oh, besides am I lacking feedback or is it just me worrying too much? Dang, stop worrying, Steven!

I like this sequence a lot - I think the Russian Dance (known as "Trepak" in Russia), and the music is just very memorable here - very cheerful and lots of spirits here. This is animated (again) by Art Babbitt, and I believe that the effects must have been done by Art Fitzpatrick (Art Babbitt's assistant), or am I thinking of a different effects artist Paul Fitzpatrick. Dang, they're both effects artists so I'm going to assume it was Art Fitzpatrick here because since he worked closely with Art Babbitt at the time - it's safe to say that it is him.

This is really a whole sequence (which lasts roughly a minute) by Art Babbitt and Art Fitzpatrick. The animation is decent, and well timed, and I see that Art Babbitt used a lot of squash and stretch in his animation of the roses.

It's another sequence that I feel that Art Babbitt doesn't get much credit for because this is really good work - altohugh Art Babbitt has been credited for many things in his famous animation career, he animated the Queen in Snow White, Gepetto in Pinocchio, the famous Mushroom Dance in the Nutcracker Suite section, and Zeus in the Pastoral Symphony in Fantasia, and the likable Mr. Stork in Dumbo. We all known him to have created the famous Goofy, and animated one of the earliest Goofy characters, and eventually Goofy stars like Woolie Reitherman or John Sibley took over the character, and became famous of animating the "How To" shorts directed by Jack Kinney.

Now, I have to admit I haven't got a lot to comment about this sequence, since it's a lot shorter about this sequence, and there isn't a lot of background details here, and nothing interesting here that could inspire you, or even that would be so long and lengthy to write. I'm afraid that this entry will be short, and I know I'm never like that but what more else could I have said?

Perhaps I could go on a little bit more: We obviously see that the flowers were done by Art Babbitt and [Art Fitzpatrick] (who probably did shadows), and an effects scene by Tom Barnes. Of course, the sequence was directed by Sam Armstrong, and layouts by Al Zinnen. Al Zinnen doesn't seem to do a lot of detailed layouts in his sequences, and they are well staged. He is another unknown layout artist. I can only identify him as Alphonse M. Zinnen born in 27th December 1903 somewhere in Michigan, United States. He started his career at the Disney Studios around 1937/38 doing layouts for many feature films throughout the periods, and worked for Disney until his apparent death on August 19th 1960, aged 56. I do not know how he died, and it will remain a mystery for me.

I'm really afraid that's it for now - but the next sequence is the final one and it's certainly more lengthy. Don't worry readers, this is probably the last short sequence, that we would come through, but over the next posts, they'll go on pages, and the more lengthy the commentaries will be.

2 comments:

Eric Noble said...

Art Babbitt really captured the feeling of the Russian dance here in this segment. He truly was a talented animator. I never knew he did this as well as the Mushroom Dance. Well, you learn something new everyday. Thank you for this Steven.

BTW, it's okay to feel let down about losing, as long as you can pick yourself up and keep going. Life is not about how we handle the peaks, but how we handle the valleys.

Steven Hartley said...

Gee, Eric that was some great advice. I was really let down because I would be pretty much more experienced at doing the job - and I felt that I didn't get the acclaim. It did mean a great deal to me.

Although, for the winners; it's not their fault they won. I shouldn't have blamed and picked on them - but I felt I was done for - but there's still a second chance.